Monday, June 11, 2007

Fluency Disorders


Van Riper's Four Tracks
Van Riper (1982) studied the course of dysfluencies n his patients and found that there were four tracks along which stuttering appeared to develop.

Track I
In track I Van Riper found that the symptoms of stuttering were first effortless, unhurried repetitions of syllables and words, marked by extreme fluctuations and long remissions. As the disorder progressed the repetitions became more rapid and irregular. The child also became concerned with their stuttering and made attempts to avoid it. This track typically resembles the behaviors of a "classic stutter"

Track II
In track II Van Riper found that the symptoms of stuttering were characterized by rapid, irregular syllable and word repetition from early on. Later, silent intervals, revisions, and interjections appeared. In this track, the child was not too concerned with dysfluency and typically did not do anything to avoid it. This track typically resembles the behaviors of a "clutterer"

Track III
In track III Van Riper found that the onset of stuttering was sudden, the child's speech was characterized by complete blockage. Often the child was unable to speak. Fear, tension, avoidance and breathing abnormalities soon followed. This track typically resembles the behaviors of a "psychogenic dysfluent"

Track IV
In track IV Van Riper identified a group of children that began to stutter suddenly. The dysfluencies consisted of repetition of phrases, words and syllables. However, in this track the child did not show any concern for his/her stuttering. This track typically resembles the behaviors of a "neurogenic dysfluent"